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What is Non-Ionizing Radiation? April 6, 2007

Posted by healthyself in 0 Hz-3kHz, 000 Hz, 1 GHz- 300 GHz, 1 mm, 100 nm - 400 nm, 3 kHz-300 GHz, 300 GHz, 400 nm - 700 nm, 700 nm, Amplified Signals, Amplitude, Analog, Antennas, Atmospheric Pressure, Blogroll, Bytes, Cable, Cell Masts, Cell Phones, Coherence, Computer Rooms, Cordless Phones, DECT, Distribution, Earth, EEG, EHF, Electrical Components, Electrical Pulses, Electrical Surges, Electrical Wiring, electromagnetic, Electromagnetic Communications, Electromagnetic Field, Electromagnetic Interference, Electromagnetic pollution, Electromagnetic Radiation, Electromagnetic Spectrum, Electromagnetic waves, Electrosensitivity, Electrosmog, ELF, EMF Research, EMF's, EMR, Entropy, Environment, Exposure, Fiber Optic, Frequencies, Hand Portables, Handheld Units, HF, High Frequencies, high voltage transmission lines, Internet, ionizing radiation, Landline, Laptops, LF, Lifestyle, Light, light beam, Long Term Health Risks, Low Frequencies, Magnetic, MCS, MF, MHz, Microwave exposure, Mobile Music, mobile telephones, Non-Thermal Levels, Penetration, Photons, Photosensitive, Pulsed Radiation, Pulses, Pure Tone, QV, Radar, Radians, radiation, Radio Frequency Radiation, Radio Waves, radioprotector, Radios, Research Needed, Resonance, Resonant Frequency, ringing, ringtones, Risk of Disease, Safe Levels, Safety, SAR, Schuman Resonance, SHF, Speakerphones, Spectrum, Telecommunications, Telephony, Transducer, Transfer, transmission, UHF, Ultraviolet, VDT, Visible Light, VLF, W/Kg, W/m2, watts, Wave Front, Waves, Who is Affected?, WiFi, Wired, Wired Phone, Wireless, Wireless Phones, X-Rays.
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Definitions

The properties and effects of non-ionising radiations are very diverse. For the purpose of this Policy non-ionising radiations include:

Extremely low frequency (ELF) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with frequencies in the range 0 Hz (static fields) to 3 kHz, including the 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields associated with the domestic mains electricity supply such as in domestic electrical appliances, electricity supply substations and overhead power lines.

Radiofrequency (RF) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with frequencies in the range 3 kHz to 300 GHz, which is produced by artificial sources such as visual display units and mobile phones.

Microwave (MW) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with frequencies in the range 1 GHz to 300 GHz, which is produced by artificial sources such as in microwave ovens and by microwave communication devices. (This radiation is now considered part of Radiofrequency radiation.)

Infrared (IR) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 700 nm and 1 mm, which is present in sunlight and produced by artificial sources such as electric radiator heaters.

Visible light

Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 400 nm (blue) and 700 nm (red), which is present in sunlight and produced by numerous artificial sources, including lasers.

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 100 nm and 400 nm, which is present in sunlight as well as produced by artificial sources such as arc welding and sterilization lamps.

http://www.unisa.edu.au/policies/policies/hr/HR30.asp

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What are Electric and Magnetic Fields? April 6, 2007

Posted by healthyself in Blogroll, Definitions, Earth, Electrical Components, Electrical Pulses, Electrical Surges, Electrical Wiring, electromagnetic, Electromagnetic Field, Electromagnetic Radiation, Electromagnetic waves, EMF's, EMR, Environment, Frequencies, High Frequencies, high voltage transmission lines, Hz, LF, Light, light beam, Low Frequencies, Magnetic, MCS, MF, MHz, Microwave exposure, Pulsed Radiation, Pulses, Radar, Radians, radiation, Radio Frequency Radiation, Radio Waves, Resonant Frequency, Safe Levels, Transducer, transmission, UHF, VDT, VLF, W/Kg, W/m2, watts, Wave Front, Waves.
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Electric fields

Magnetic fields

  1. Electric fields arise from voltage.
  2. Their strength is measured in Volts per metre (V/m)
  3. An electric field can be present even when a device is switched off.
  4. Field strength decreases with distance from the source.
  5. Most building materials shield electric fields to some extent.
  1. Magnetic fields arise from current flows.
  2. Their strength is measured in amperes per meter (A/m). Commonly, EMF investigators use a related measure, flux density (in microtesla (µT) or millitesla (mT) instead.
  3. Magnetic fields exist as soon as a device is switched on and current flows.
  4. Field strength decreases with distance from the source.
  5. Magnetic fields are not attenuated by most mat

http://www.who.int/peh-emf/about/WhatisEMF/en/

High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields April 5, 2007

Posted by healthyself in Amplified Signals, Amplitude, Antennas, Blogroll, Cable, Cell Masts, Cell phone industry, Cell phone safety, Cell Phones, Computer Rooms, Cordless Phones, Definitions, Digital, Distribution, Electrical Components, Electrical Pulses, Electrical Wiring, Electromagnetic Communications, Electromagnetic Field, Electromagnetic Interference, Electromagnetic pollution, Electromagnetic Radiation, Electromagnetic Spectrum, Electromagnetic waves, Electrosensitivity, Electrosmog, ELF, Emergency Medicine, EMF Research, EMF's, EMR, Energy, Environment, Epidemiology, Exposure, Frequencies, GHz, Government's role, HF, High Frequencies, high voltage transmission lines, Homes, HOuseholds, HRD, Human Resources, Hz, Infrared, Interdisciplinary, Landline, Laptops, Legal Issues, Lifestyle, Low Frequencies, MCS, MF, MHz, Microwave exposure, Mitigation, mobile telephones, Oscillate, Pulsed Radiation, Pulses, Radar, radiation, Radio Frequency Radiation, Radio Waves, Radios, Research Needed, Resonant Frequency, Risk of Disease, Sound, Speakerphones, Telecommunications, Telephony, Transducer, Transfer, transmission, UHF, VDT, VLF, W/Kg, W/m2, watts, Wave Front, Waves, Who is Affected?, WiFi, Wired, Wired Phone, Wireless, Wireless Phones, Workplace, X-Rays.
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“Mobile telephones, television and radio transmitters and radar produce RF fields. These fields are used to transmit information over long distances and form the basis of telecommunications as well as radio and television broadcasting all over the world. Microwaves are RF fields at high frequencies in the GHz range. In microwaves ovens, we use them to quickly heat food.””At radio frequencies, electric and magnetic fields are closely interrelated and we typically measure their levels as power densities in watts per square metre (W/m2).”

“Key points:

  • The electromagnetic spectrum encompasses both natural and human-made sources of electromagnetic fields.
  • Frequency and wavelength characterise an electromagnetic field. In an electromagnetic wave, these two characteristics are directly related to each other: the higher the frequency the shorter the wavelength.
  • Ionizing radiation such as X-ray and gamma-rays consists of photons which carry sufficient energy to break molecular bonds. Photons of electromagnetic waves at power and radio frequencies have much lower energy that do not have this ability.
  • Electric fields exist whenever charge is present and are measured in volts per metre (V/m). Magnetic fields arise from current flow. Their flux densities are measured in microtesla (µT) or millitesla (mT).
  • At radio and microwave frequencies, electric and magnetic fields are considered together as the two components of an electromagnetic wave. Power density, measured in watts per square metre (W/m2), describes the intensity of these fields.
  • Low frequency and high frequency electromagnetic waves affect the human body in different ways.
  • Electrical power supplies and appliances are the most common sources of low frequency electric and magnetic fields in our living environment. Everyday sources of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields are telecommunications, broadcasting antennas and microwave ovens.”

http://www.who.int/peh-emf/about/WhatisEMF/en/

What is Analog? September 26, 2006

Posted by healthyself in Amplified Signals, Amplitude, Bioeffects, Biological Effects, Blogroll, Cell phone safety, Cell Phones, Cordless Phones, Decision Making, Definitions, Digital, Electrical Components, Electrical Surges, Electrical Wiring, Electrochemical, electromagnetic, Electromagnetic Communications, Electromagnetic Field, Electromagnetic Interference, Electromagnetic pollution, Electromagnetic Spectrum, Electromagnetic waves, Electrosensitivity, Electrosmog, EMF Research, EMF's, EMR, Environment, Frequencies, Health related, Heart Disease, Internet, Lifestyle, Light, Microwave exposure, mobile telephones, Pulsed Radiation, radiation, Radio Waves, Radios, Risk Factor, Sound, Speakerphones, Telecommunications, Telephony, Toxic Interactions, Transducer, Transfer, transmission.
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Analog – A signaling method that uses continuous changes in the amplitude or frequency of a radio transmission to convey information. It relies on a continuous (rather than pulsed as in digital) electrical signal that varies in amplitude or frequency in response to changes of sound, light, position, etc., impressed on a transducer in the sending device; opposite of digital.

http://www.mobiledia.com/glossary/23.html