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What is Non-Ionizing Radiation? April 6, 2007

Posted by healthyself in 0 Hz-3kHz, 000 Hz, 1 GHz- 300 GHz, 1 mm, 100 nm - 400 nm, 3 kHz-300 GHz, 300 GHz, 400 nm - 700 nm, 700 nm, Amplified Signals, Amplitude, Analog, Antennas, Atmospheric Pressure, Blogroll, Bytes, Cable, Cell Masts, Cell Phones, Coherence, Computer Rooms, Cordless Phones, DECT, Distribution, Earth, EEG, EHF, Electrical Components, Electrical Pulses, Electrical Surges, Electrical Wiring, electromagnetic, Electromagnetic Communications, Electromagnetic Field, Electromagnetic Interference, Electromagnetic pollution, Electromagnetic Radiation, Electromagnetic Spectrum, Electromagnetic waves, Electrosensitivity, Electrosmog, ELF, EMF Research, EMF's, EMR, Entropy, Environment, Exposure, Fiber Optic, Frequencies, Hand Portables, Handheld Units, HF, High Frequencies, high voltage transmission lines, Internet, ionizing radiation, Landline, Laptops, LF, Lifestyle, Light, light beam, Long Term Health Risks, Low Frequencies, Magnetic, MCS, MF, MHz, Microwave exposure, Mobile Music, mobile telephones, Non-Thermal Levels, Penetration, Photons, Photosensitive, Pulsed Radiation, Pulses, Pure Tone, QV, Radar, Radians, radiation, Radio Frequency Radiation, Radio Waves, radioprotector, Radios, Research Needed, Resonance, Resonant Frequency, ringing, ringtones, Risk of Disease, Safe Levels, Safety, SAR, Schuman Resonance, SHF, Speakerphones, Spectrum, Telecommunications, Telephony, Transducer, Transfer, transmission, UHF, Ultraviolet, VDT, Visible Light, VLF, W/Kg, W/m2, watts, Wave Front, Waves, Who is Affected?, WiFi, Wired, Wired Phone, Wireless, Wireless Phones, X-Rays.
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Definitions

The properties and effects of non-ionising radiations are very diverse. For the purpose of this Policy non-ionising radiations include:

Extremely low frequency (ELF) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with frequencies in the range 0 Hz (static fields) to 3 kHz, including the 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields associated with the domestic mains electricity supply such as in domestic electrical appliances, electricity supply substations and overhead power lines.

Radiofrequency (RF) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with frequencies in the range 3 kHz to 300 GHz, which is produced by artificial sources such as visual display units and mobile phones.

Microwave (MW) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with frequencies in the range 1 GHz to 300 GHz, which is produced by artificial sources such as in microwave ovens and by microwave communication devices. (This radiation is now considered part of Radiofrequency radiation.)

Infrared (IR) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 700 nm and 1 mm, which is present in sunlight and produced by artificial sources such as electric radiator heaters.

Visible light

Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 400 nm (blue) and 700 nm (red), which is present in sunlight and produced by numerous artificial sources, including lasers.

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation

Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 100 nm and 400 nm, which is present in sunlight as well as produced by artificial sources such as arc welding and sterilization lamps.

http://www.unisa.edu.au/policies/policies/hr/HR30.asp

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What is the Electromagnetic Spectrum? September 21, 2006

Posted by healthyself in Blogroll, Cell phone safety, Color, Definitions, Electromagnetic Field, Electromagnetic waves, Frequencies, Gamma Rays, Infrared, Light, light beam, Low Frequencies, Magnetic, MHz, Microwave exposure, Oscillate, Photons, Radio Waves, Spectrum, Visible Light.
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“..Electromagnetic radiation can be described in terms of a stream of photons, each traveling in a wave-like pattern, moving at the speed of light and carrying some amount of energy. … the only difference between radio waves, visible light, and gamma-rays is the energy of the photons. Radio waves have photons with low energies, microwaves have a little more energy than radio waves, infrared has still more, then visible, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma-rays.””Actually, the amount of energy a photon has makes it sometimes behave more like a wave and sometimes more like a particle. This is called the “ wave-particle duality” of light. …only in how it behaves. Low energy photons (such as radio) behave more like waves, while higher energy photons (such as X-rays) behave more like particles. …the electromagnetic spectrum can be expressed in terms of energy, wavelength, or frequency. Each way of thinking about the EM spectrum is related to the others in a precise mathematical way. The relationships are:
the wavelength equals the speed of light divided by the frequency
or
lambda = c / nu” http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/science/know_l2/emspectrum.html