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Lymphoma in dogs July 30, 2008

Posted by healthyself in Animal Research, Animals, Bioeffects, Biologically Signficant, Blogroll, Cancer, Cell phone safety, Electrosensitivity, EMF's, Health related, Lymphoma.
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“Several studies have linked residential electromagnetic fields (EMFs) with human cancers, especially those of the blood. A new study now suggests that these fields may pose a similar risk to pets”

“…….coworkers….. focused their study on 230 dogs hospitalized with cancer. These included 93 animals with canine lymphoma–a common blood cancer whose origins remain unknown….”After characterizing the wiring in each pet’s home, …[the] team measured, whenever possible, actual magnetic fields where the dog spent most of its time.”

“Overhead power lines running along streets and up to homes constitute the biggest overall contributor to residential EMFs”… “factors associated with those lines also showed the strongest link to lymphoma. They included high front-yard fields (more than 2 milligauss) or “open secondary” wires (that have been associated with very high fields). Compared to animals whose homes were fed by buried power lines, dogs exposed to these factors faced double the cancer risk–and it tripled if the animal spent 25 percent or more of its time outside.”

…the most powerful statistical association to the cancer occurred in those 10 dogs whose homes were located very near a large, “primary” power distribution line. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, researchers found that the dogs had 13.4 times the lymphoma risk of animals from homes with buried power lines.”

…” this investigation suggests that “dogs may act as a ‘sentinel’ species” for studying environmental threats to the families with whom they share a home.”

Science News,  March 18, 1995

COPYRIGHT 1995 Science Service, Inc.
COPYRIGHT 2004 Gale Group

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Animal Deaths Near Cell Phone Relay Tower April 1, 2008

Posted by healthyself in Accelerated Aging, Aging, Alarming, Animal Research, Animals, Bioeffects, Biological Effects, Biologically Signficant, birds, Blogroll, Canaries, Captive Animals, Cell Masts, Cell Phone Transmissions, Danger, Death, Death Rates, Diagnostic marker, EMF Research, EMF-induced effects, Environment, Evidence, Exposure, Health Risks, Heightened Risk, Horse, Interdisciplinary, Investigate, Investigators, lethality, Long Term Health Effects, Long Term Health Risks, masts, Medical Research, Pulsed Radiation, Rabbits, Risk of Disease, Rural Areas, Safety, State Parks, University, University Research, Unsafe, Who is Affected?.
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Health officials ponder farm’s dead animal toll. “Rabbits, goats – even a horse – are among the roughly 100 animals to mysteriously die at a Nova Scotia farm in the past five years. And with the recent deaths of a number of wild birds at the farm, the Natural Resources Department has stepped in and sent one of the animal carcasses to the Atlantic Veterinary College for testing.”….”after years of questions”….”the cause: a cellphone relay tower erected beside the farm. A tenant on the farm for the last two years,”… “the farm’s owner purchased the property about a year before the cell tower went up. Before the tower, the farm’s owner”….”never experienced problems. “

“When that tower went up, he ended up losing his animals little by little,” … “While domestic birds sang and a rooster crowed in the background”….a litany of deaths on the farm…”a dog staggering around and then keeling over, and ….a goat suddenly dying from a seizure. Four years ago, a horse fell over on its side, never to recover.”

“How many animals have died?”

“You couldn’t count them,”….”Over the winter, …a large truck box with the bodies of rabbits and birds.”

“It’s the latter that’s attracted the attention of the province’s Natural Resources Department. Upon hearing of robins, finches and other song birds dying at the property, department officials requested that the farm owner send an animal for testing to the Atlantic Veterinary College in Charlottetown.”

“College vets will conduct tests on a guinea pig that died at the farm, but it could be weeks before they have answers.”

from http://hfxnews.ca/