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Sound, Noise, Vibration and….Circulation October 23, 2006

Posted by healthyself in Aesthetics, Amplified Signals, Amplitude, Art, Bioeffects, Biological Effects, Body Temperature, Buzzing, Children's health, Circulation, Color, Computer Rooms, Decision Making, Ear, Electrical Components, Electrical Pulses, Electrical Surges, Electrical Wiring, Electromagnetic Field, Electromagnetic Spectrum, Electromagnetic waves, Electrosensitivity, Electrosmog, ELF, EMF Research, EMF's, Environment, Exposure, Frequencies, Health related, Hearing, Interdisciplinary, Lifestyle, Long Term Health Risks, Men's Health, Parenting, Pulses, Radio Frequency Radiation, Radio Waves, Research Needed, Risk Factor, Safe Levels, School administrators, Schools, Sound, Who is Affected?, Women's Health, Workplace.
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  "In art processes, noise can be caused by vibration, forging,

woodworking and other machinery, pneumatic tools, exhaust fans,

etc.  In particular, old or improperly maintained equipment tends

to create more noise.  In general, if someone has to raise their

voice to be heard by another person one to two feet away, then

the noise level is too high, especially if it is a steady noise....
Some studies have shown that woodworking teachers have a higher rate
of hearing loss than other teachers."

     "Sound intensity is measured in decibels (dB), on a

logarithmic scale.  In this scale, 90 dB is ten times more

intense than 80 dB, and 110 dB is ten times more intense than 100

dB.  The sound intensity doubles for every increase of 3 dB,

showing that small increases in decibel levels can involve large

increases in sound intensity.  Table 7-1 shows the decibel levels

of common sounds.

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Table 7-1   Approximate Sound Levels of Common Noise Sources

Source                                       Sound Level (dB)

Jet engine                                      160

Loud amplified music                            118

Planer                                          115

Portable grinder                                110

Circular saw                                    105

Sander, foundry                                  95

Classroom teaching voice at 3 feet               75

Normal speaking voice at 3 feet

"Pneumatic and vibrating equipment such as chain saws can

also create problems due to vibration.  Raynaud's phenomenon,

which is also called "white fingers" or "dead fingers", affects

the circulation of the fingers, causing them to turn white from

lack of blood and to lose sensation.  Vibration can cause this,

particularly with simultaneous exposure to cold, for example,

from the air blast of pneumatic tools.  This condition is

initially temporary, but can spread to the whole hand and cause

permanent damage."

http://www.uic.edu/sph/glakes/harts1/HARTS_library/school7.txt
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