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Iraqis Like Cell Phones September 4, 2006

Posted by healthyself in Biological Effects, Blogroll, Brain Cancer, Cancer, Cell phone industry, Cell phone safety, Cell phone towers, Cell Phones, Children's health, Communication, Community, Decision Making, Digital, Ear, Electromagnetic pollution, Electromagnetic waves, Electrosensitivity, Electrosmog, ELF, Emergency Medicine, EMF Research, EMF's, Employees, Environment, Government's role, Hand Portables, Health related, Humor, Lifestyle, Long Term Health Risks, Low Frequencies, Men's Health, MHz, Microwave exposure, Military, mobile telephones, Public Policy, Pulsed Radiation, radiation, Research, Risk of Disease, Safe Levels, Safety, SAR, School administrators, Teenagers, transmission, University, VDT, Who is Affected?, WiFi, Women's Health, Workplace.
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“I bought my first cellphone this year. I’ve been holding out, at first because I was a self-righteous non-conformist and then because they really annoyed me as conversation interrupters, social gathering destroyers and “symbols” of importance and popularity. ”

“Yeah, but they’re also useful, you know, like if you get into an accident or something.”

“Yeah, like a cellphone is going to save lives.”

“Currently there are 7.1 million cell phone subscribers in Iraq, up from the 1.4 million there were last year. For those living in Iraq, cell phones are more than ultra hip, they’re ultra necessary. For the military they are tools used to detonate bombs.”

“For common citizens they are tools that provide safety and a “sense of security.”

“Cellphones enable the majority to keep a close watch on loved ones, avoid dangerous situations and locations, and uphold a sense of community through a safe outlet of self-expression. Humorous videos, amusing texts and jokes attacking everything from American soldiers to Saddam Hussein are passed around frequently through phones.”

“In Iraq, there is such an accumulation of frustration,” said Fauwzya al-Attiya, a sociologist at Baghdad University. “If an Iraqi does not embrace humor in his life, he’s finished.”

“And so. I’ve been proven wrong, again. Cellphones can be beneficial. But don’t forget they might give you brain cancer.

http://www.benettontalk.com/2006/08/cellphones_uplift_iraq.html

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