jump to navigation

Why It Is Hard To Find Out The Truth About Hazards Like EMF’s September 3, 2006

Posted by healthyself in Animal Research, Bioeffects, Biological Activity, Biological Effects, Blogroll, Cell phone industry, Cell phone safety, Cell phone towers, Cell Phones, Communication, Community, Decision Making, Digital, Electromagnetic pollution, Electromagnetic waves, Electrosensitivity, Electrosmog, ELF, EMF Research, EMF's, EMR, Environment, Epidemiologists, Funding, GHz, Government's role, Grants, Hand Portables, Health related, High Frequencies, high voltage transmission lines, HOuseholds, Hz, Legal Issues, Lifestyle, Low Frequencies, Medical Research, MHz, Microwave exposure, mobile telephones, Public Policy, Pulsed Radiation, radiation, Risk of Disease, Safe Levels, Stress, transmission, University, VDT, W/Kg, Who is Affected?, WiFi, Workplace.
trackback
By: Michaels, David, Scientific American, 00368733, Jun2005, Vol. 292, Issue 6
Database: Academic Search Premier
DOUBT Is Their Product

Industry groups are fighting government regulation by formenting scientific uncertainty

“Few scientific challenges are more complex than understanding the health risks of a chemical or drug. Investigators cannot feed toxic compounds to people to see what doses cause cancer. Instead laboratory researchers rely on animal tests, and epidemiologists examine the human exposures that have already happened in the field. Both types of studies have many uncertainties, and scientists must extrapolate from the evidence to make causal inferences and recommend protective measures. Because absolute certainty is rarely an option, regulatory programs would not be effective if such proof were required. Government officials have to use the best available evidence to set limits for harmful chemicals and determine the safety of pharmaceuticals.”

“Uncertainty is an inherent problem of science, but manufactured uncertainty is another matter entirely. Over the past three decades, industry groups have frequently become involved in the investigative process when their interests are threatened. If, for example, studies show that a company is exposing its workers to dangerous levels of a certain chemical, the business typically responds by hiring its’. own researchers to cast doubt on the studies. Or if a pharmaceutical firm faces questions about the safety of one of its drugs, its executives trumpet company sponsored trials that show no significant health risks while ignoring or hiding other studies that are much less reassuring. The vilification of threatening research as “junk science” and the corresponding sanctification of industry-commissioned research as “sound science” has become nothing less than standard operating procedure in some parts of corporate America.”

“In 1969 an executive at Brown & Williamson, a cigarette maker now owned by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, unwisely committed to paper the perfect slogan for his industry’s disinformation campaign: “Doubt is our product since it is the best means of competing with the ‘body of fact’ that exists in the mind of the general public.” In recent years, many other industries have eagerly adopted this strategy. Corporations have mounted campaigns to question studies documenting the adverse health effects of exposure to beryllium, lead, mercury, vinyl chloride, chromium, benzene, benzidine, nickel, and a long list of other toxic chemicals and medications. What is more, Congress and the administration of President George W. Bush have encouraged such tactics by making it easier for private groups to challenge government-funded research. Although in some cases, companies may be raising legitimate arguments, the overall result is disturbing: many corporations have successfully avoided expense and inconvenience by blocking and stalling much needed protections for public health.”

 

http://www.powerlinefacts.com/Sciam_article_on_lobbying.htm

Advertisements

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: