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What is Safest? August 26, 2006

Posted by healthyself in Cell phone safety, Cell Phones, Children, Children's health, Decision Making, Electromagnetic pollution, Electromagnetic waves, Electrosensitivity, Electrosmog, EMF Research, EMF's, Employees, EMR, Environment, Hand Portables, Health related, High Frequencies, high voltage transmission lines, HOuseholds, Immune system, Kids, Legal Issues, Lifestyle, Long Term Health Risks, Men's Health, Microwave exposure, Mitigation, mobile telephones, Pulsed Radiation, radiation, Risk of Disease, Safe Levels, Safety, SAR, transmission, Tweenies, Who is Affected?, Women's Health, Workplace.
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“While the downside is weaker connectivity, the upside is that, at a measly rating of .12, Audiovox’s 6600-series of phones have the lowest specific absorption rate (SAR) rating of any cell phone available in the United States.  While a bona fide link between cell phone usage and cancer has yet to be established, smart consumers can play it safe by seeking out cell phones that fall at the bottom end of the FCC-approved range rather than the top end.  Earlier this year, in a deal on Amazon.com that not only gave me the phones for free, but that paid me cold hard cash to take them,  I got suckered into taking two Motorola V265 phones only to find out later that they had SAR ratings of 1.55 (tied with Motorola’s V120c for the worst rated SAR rating of any phone available in the US).   As I became more familiar with the SAR issue and the fact that it may be another decade before we know anything for sure about the potential connection of cell phones and cancer, I realized that it’s definitely something I’m going to think hard about before investing in a cell phone for my children.  For example, one like the FireFly that’s specifically designed for little kids, but that has a .945 SAR rating (a 688 percent increase over the Audiovox’s .12 rating).”

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