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Electromagnetic Fields of Household Appliances October 1, 2006

Posted by healthyself in 50 Hz, Bioeffects, Biological Effects, Blogroll, Buzzing, Cell phone safety, Computer Rooms, Digital, Electrical Components, Electrical Pulses, Electrical Surges, Electrochemical, Electromagetic pollution, Electromagnetic Communications, Electromagnetic Field, Electromagnetic Interference, Electromagnetic pollution, Electromagnetic waves, Electrosensitivity, Electrosmog, ELF, Emergency Medicine, EMF Research, EMF's, Employees, EMR, Environment, Family, Frequencies, Hand Portables, Handheld Units, Health related, HF, High Frequencies, high voltage transmission lines, HOuseholds, Hz, Internet, LF, Lifestyle, Light, Long Term Health Risks, Low Frequencies, Men's Health, MHz, Microwave exposure, mobile telephones, nerves, neurological, Parenting, Pulsed Radiation, Pulses, radiation, Radio Waves, Radios, Research Needed, Telecommunications, transmission, WiFi, Women's Health, Workplace.
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Electric appliances in the household
The strongest power frequency electric fields that are ordinarily encountered in the environment exist beneath high voltage transmission lines. In contrast, the strongest magnetic fields at power frequency are normally found very close to motors and other electrical appliances, as well as in specialized equipment such as magnetic resonance scanners used for medical imaging.

(Typical electric field strengths measured near household appliances
(at a distance of 30 cm)
(From: Federal Office for Radiation Safety, Germany 1999)

Electric appliance Electric field strength (V/m)
Stereo receiver 180
Iron 120
Refrigerator 120
Mixer 100
Toaster 80
Hair dryer 80
Colour TV 60
Coffee machine 60
Vacuum cleaner 50
Electric oven 8
Light bulb 5
Guideline limit value 5000

Many people are surprised when they become aware of the variety of magnetic field levels found near various appliances. The field strength does not depend on how large, complex, powerful or noisy the device is. Furthermore, even between apparently similar devices, the strength of the magnetic field may vary a lot. For example, while some hair dryers are surrounded by a very strong field, others hardly produce any magnetic field at all. These differences in magnetic field strength are related to product design. The following table shows typical values for a number of electrical devices commonly found in homes and workplaces. The measurements were taken in Germany and all of the appliances operate on electricity at a frequency of 50 Hz. It should be noted that the actual exposure levels vary considerably depending on the model of appliance and distance from it.

Typical magnetic field strength of household appliances at various distances

Electric appliance

3 cm distance (µT)

30 cm distance (µT)

1 m distance (µT)

Hair dryer

6 – 2000

0.01 – 7

0.01 – 0.03

Electric shaver

15 – 1500

0.08 – 9

0.01 – 0.03

Vacuum cleaner

200 – 800

2 – 20

0.13 – 2

Fluorescent light

40 – 400

0.5 – 2

0.02 – 0.25

Microwave oven

73 – 200

4 – 8

0.25 – 0.6

Portable radio

16 – 56

1

< 0.01

Electric oven

1 – 50

0.15 – 0.5

0.01 – 0.04

Washing machine

0.8 – 50

0.15 – 3

0.01 – 0.15

Iron

8 – 30

0.12 – 0.3

0.01 – 0.03

Dishwasher

3.5 – 20

0.6 – 3

0.07 – 0.3

Computer

0.5 – 30

< 0.01

Refrigerator

0.5 – 1.7

0.01 – 0.25

<0.01

Colour TV

2.5 – 50

0.04 – 2

0.01 – 0.15

With most household appliances the magnetic field strength at a distance of 30 cm is well below the guideline limit for the general public of 100 µT.

http://www.who.int/peh-emf/about/WhatisEMF/en/index3.html

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Comments»

1. ahmed - October 15, 2006

i would like to know amore about the electromagnetic field in physics
because iam physics major


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